Wipeout

Struggling to surf the stream of consciousness of an over-thinking mind.
mythicalogical:

thesexypenguin:


The educational system in one image.

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will spend the rest of its life thinking it’s an idiot.” -Albert Einstein

Reblogging. always. always. always.

mythicalogical:

thesexypenguin:

The educational system in one image.

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will spend the rest of its life thinking it’s an idiot.” -Albert Einstein

Reblogging. always. always. always.

(via arisentic)

sarahseeandersen:

Hey guys! A lot of people have been writing to me about the Doodle Time Zine.  I just printed a whooole bunch, so now I can put it for sale on etsy again. All zines are signed and ship anywhere in the world!

Also, the “Waking Up” postcards are available again too :)

Find my etsy here

Ready for recording…tone hunting.

Ready for recording…tone hunting.

This year July has 5 Fridays, 5 Saturdays and 5 Sundays. This happens once every 823 years. This is called money bags. So copy this and money will arrive within 4 days. Based on Chinese Feng Shui, the one who does not copy, will be without money. Figured I’d pass this on!

darklight1824:

doingthemost510:

purelyawkward:

MONEY.

image

Only reblogging because I’m a greedy bitch who wants money.

image

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Hey doesn’t hurt to reblog ya knoww and if money is involved….

 image

My mom’s paycheck arrives in 4d days, THIS SHIT WORKKSS

chinese feng shui knows about tumblr ? image

brunetteinferno:

OMG I didnt notice until today.I reblogged this and got 10 dollars :D

got to pay for stuff somehow so why not. 

forever reblog

haha I got money today!!! 

Show me the moneyyyy!

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MONEY MONEY MONEYYYYYY!

Why am I doing this?

(Source: ickest, via arisentic)

lemanavecleslunettes:

We will have a releaseparty for our new album on saturday March 29th at ARCI Ohibò in Milano! We are really looking forward to this party. We will share the stage with an amazing folksinger, Laish. Hope to see you there! 
|| POP DAYS #10 ||
FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1469305889950489
LE MAN AVEC LES LUNETTES (ITA, We Were Never Being Boring)
LAISH (UK, Willkommen Records) 
Artwork by Roberto Redondi

lemanavecleslunettes:

We will have a releaseparty for our new album on saturday March 29th at ARCI Ohibò in Milano! We are really looking forward to this party. We will share the stage with an amazing folksinger, Laish. Hope to see you there!

|| POP DAYS #10 ||

FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1469305889950489

LE MAN AVEC LES LUNETTES (ITA, We Were Never Being Boring)

LAISH (UK, Willkommen Records)

Artwork by Roberto Redondi

jhnmyr:

John Mayer/Steve Jordan/Pino Palladino/Chick Corea/Wallace Roney

Here’s a full seven minute tune I loosely composed called “Little Sur,” recorded last February in New York City. I got together with some of my friends and favorite players for six amazing days of playing music with no rules, no plans, and no pressure. Oh, and no vocals. What came from it was a really inspired batch of recordings. Hours of music that I’ll need to sift through at some point should it ever become an album. (I hope it does.) If you’re wondering where I am in the mix, that’s me playing a 6 string bass-like guitar… Pino and I are kind of both living in the bass space. As soon as Chick came in on the piano, I knew something really deep was taking place.  This is a rough mix that was given to me at the end of the day, as it has lived on my laptop since.

I tried to find a minute, two minute clip to share with you, but these recordings just don’t work any other way than in their unabridged form. So here it is. Free music. Played freely, shared freely. Put it on and go for the ride… If you dig all seven minutes, then surely you deserve them. 

There are times for marketing strategies, and there are times for just  p l a y i n g. The original design for all musicians.  Hope you enjoy hearing this as much as I did. 

John 

neuromorphogenesis:

What Happens in the Brain When Blind People Learn to See With Sound

Deprived of sight, blind people manage to squeeze an amazing amount of information out of their other senses. Doing this requires their brains to do some reorganizing. To learn about some of these changes, scientists studied the brains of blind people who’ve learned to use an augmented reality system that converts images into soundscapes.

The system was invented in the early ’90s, but it’s not widely used. The way it works is a person puts on a pair of goggles with a built-in camera and software that converts images captured by the camera into sounds. For example, the pitch of the sound (high or low) indicates the vertical position of an object; the timing and duration of the sound indicate the object’s horizontal position and width (you can see and hear a demo of a similar technology here). For real world scenes, the sounds are complex — in fact, they sound a bit like a garbled transmission from an alien spacecraft.

But with enough practice people can learn to interpret the sounds and form a mental image of objects — including people — that appear in front of them.

When sighted people see an outline or silhouette of a human body, areas of the cerebral cortex that specialize in making sense of visual stimuli become active. One of these, the extrastriate body area, seems particularly interested in bodies: It responds more strongly to images of the human body than to other types of objects.

But blindness cuts off the usual flow of information from the eyes to this part of the brain, and people who’ve been blind since birth have never actually seen a human form. Something must change in their brains when they learn to perceive body shapes using sound. Do visual parts of the brain start responding to sounds? Or do auditory parts of the brain start responding to body shapes? It’s a neat trick either way.

To find out what really happens, Ella Striem-Amit and Amir Amedi of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem scanned the brains of seven congenitally blind people who’d trained for an average of 73 hours on the augmented reality system. After training, they achieved 78 percent accuracy at classifying three different types of objects: people, everyday objects (like a cellphone), or textured patterns.

In some cases, they could do even more. “During training, the participants were asked to report the body posture of the people in the images they ‘saw,’ and could verbally describe it quite well, and also mimic it themselves,” Striem-Amit said.

Functional MRI brain scans of the blind subjects and a group of sighted people showed that many of the same visual brain regions became active in both groups when they perceived images of the human form. Even though the blind subjects weren’t actually seeing anything, their extrastriate body area fired up when they heard a soundscape corresponding to a person’s body. As in the sighted subjects, the responses in this area were specific — everyday objects and textures didn’t elicit as much of a response, Striem-Amit and Amedi report today in Current Biology.

Striem-Amit and Amedi also found that in blind people as well as sighted people, body shapes also activated an area called the temporal-parietal junction, which some researchers think is involved in figuring out the intentions of other people.

The study illustrates that the brain can be remarkably malleable, says Kalanit Grill-Spector, a neuroscientist at Stanford University. When blind people learn to read Braille, their visual cortex becomes sensitive to touch, she notes. “However, there has been little evidence for auditory stimuli driving responses in visual cortex in the blind,” Grill-Spector said. ”For example making human sounds such as clapping or laughing does not seem to activate visual cortex in the blind.” (One exception is sounds of motion, such as footsteps, which can trigger activity in a brain region that normally responds to the sight of moving objects, but not to sounds).

At the same time, the study also shows that some aspects of brain organization remain stable, Grill-Spector says. The extrastriate body area, for example, appears to specialize in detecting human forms in sighted and blind people alike. It just uses different inputs to do it.

Striem-Amit and Amendi acknowledge in their paper that this type of augmented reality device has yet to be widely adopted by blind people. With some improvements, they’re hoping it might be. Amendi’s lab has just released a a new free iPhone app called EyeMusic that adds new algorithms and different musical instruments to provide information about color.

Whether that’s enough to make the technology finally take off remains to be heard.